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Rio Negro River

amazon

The Rio Negro has this color because of the humus that is carried into the river by the floods. The acidity of its waters is high, with a pH of 3.8 to 4.9 (due to a lot of acids inside it from the decomposition of the plants), so many insects and mosquitoes do not survive in the region.
Being the largest tributary and most large black water river in the world is the second largest in the volume of water, second only to the Amazon River.

We’re here for you!

A word from the president.

Capt Peacock Yachts Expeditions

Fellow guests and friends, the first part of the season, which ended late December 2016, was fantastic and typical with many fish caught and several adventures taken… see the following new 2017 video: http://www.captpeacock.com/video/

We found that things had changed drastically, however, after our first trip of the second half of the season: January 5, 2017. And since then, the fishing proved tougher, and few fish caught (less than a third of what we expected).

In fact, exceptionally unseasonal rains are the case all over Brazil right now with many parts of the country flooding. It was a total unexpected mess in the entire country, consequently affecting the quality of the fishing grounds in Amazon as well.

What we did, however, was to suggest to all of our guests to reschedule their trips. Let me state again, though, that this was a recommendation. We were informing them of the realities of Brazil’s Amazon that we cannot control nor predict at that time, which never happened that way before: the water level was very high, the fishing was very poor, and unseasonal rains occurred on a daily basis.

We gladly offered our guests other available weeks for a better fishing experience and, of course, at no extra cost. That is how much we appreciate our guests’ business!

Capt. Peacock is proud to have not just best fishing concept experience, but mainly, principals and ethical values!

Brazil Amazon Fishing Report: January 12 – 20, 2017

Capt Peacock Brazil's Amazon Peacock Bass

Amazonas is a beautiful lady.

But sometimes she can be cruel, such was the case last two weeks.

This because, once again, the water levels of the Rio Negro didn’t cooperate with us fish wise.

Oh, it’s still a gorgeous river and one our guests had a fantastic time exploring via our fleet of 14 Bass Tracker boats and from the deck of our luxury yacht but as for the fishing, again, not great at all.

See, fish in the Amazon feed according to what the water level is doing.  When the water goes up, the fish swim into the jungle to protect themselves against their natural predators and gorge.

When the water goes down, they quit hunting for prey.

And they quit going after lures.

When the water drops, the fish become aggressive, eating almost anything they can get in their mouth.

And for the second week in a row, the water went up.

All told, our 23 guests landed 202 Peacock Bass plus a host of catfish, piranha, dogfish, and barracuda.

That is not the kind of fishing we like!

Not at all.

But we do the best we can under such conditions.

Capt Peacock

In addition, this group of husbands and wives, friends, and young couples witnessed birds and monkeys, watched pod after pod of pink dolphins, lounged in hammocks, drank like fishes and ate like kings.  They also enjoyed a traditional barbeque lunch in the Brazilian rainforest, a chef prepared dinner under the stars on an unexplored beach, sang, swapped stories, and bragged about how hard they were fishing.

Yes, they were a great bunch of great guests and, in typical fashion, half of them booked a return trip for next season already.

I know this because I know Amazônia.

I’m Capt Peacock

Capt Peacock

Fishing Report: Jan 5 – 13, 2017

Fishing Report: Jan 5 - 13, 2017 Peacock Bass

By Capt Peacock

Many men go fishing all of their lives without knowing that it is not fish they are after. —Henry David Thoreau

I’ve always loved this quote by Thoreau and I’m happy that many of my guests this week agree with it.

This because the fishing this week was pretty bad.

Not because of my guides or the anglers we had on board mind you, but because of the water level.

See, fish in the Amazon base their feeding habits on what the water level is doing.  When the water goes up, the fish think the jungle is about to flood and they’re on their way to gorging and thus quit putting forth an effort to hunt for prey.  When the water drops, the fish eat anything they can get in their mouth.

This week the water went up.

So despite everyones’ – and I do mean everyones’ – best efforts, very few Peacock Bass were landed.

But then like Thoreau said, fishing’s not just about fishing.

No, it’s about seeing new places, meeting new friends, encountering a new culture, and cruising one of the last truly unspoiled places on Earth.

And that’s what my 21 guests did.

Fishing Report: Jan 5 - 13, 2017 Peacock Bass

This group of husbands and wives, friends, buddies, and fathers and sons fished hard, enjoyed a traditional barbeque lunch under the canopy of the rainforest, a chef prepared dinner under the stars on a virgin beach, drank like fishes, sang, swapped stories, bragged about how hard they were fishing, and took a ton of donations to a native village.

Brazilian Red and Green-Macaw

In addition they took note of all the birds and monkeys they saw, were amazed at the antics of pod after pod of pink dolphins, lounged in hammocks, and danced on the deck.

Fishing Report: Jan 5 - 13, 2017 Peacock Bass

And I must say that despite the low number of Peacocks caught, not one of these fantastic guests complained about the fishing conditions.  Instead, they showered my guides for their efforts, praised my chef for his meals, cocktails, and hors d’oeuvres, and bragged endlessly about the service my staff showed them.

Yes, they were a great bunch of guests and, in typical fashion, half of them booked a return trip for next season.

But then I knew they’d do so, even with the poor fishing.

I know this because I know Amazônia.

I’m Capt Peacock.